A Prosecco Worthy of Its Name

A Prosecco Worthy of Its Name

This bubbly is 'good all alone or with crudités, simple fish or pasta primavera'

SHARE

If by any chance your first reaction to Prosecco was “meh,” you were probably drinking one of the “sell it now while the gettin’s good” examples. There’s a lot more bad Prosecco available these days as its popularity has soared. (Nota bene: Price can be a fairly good barometer.) Today’s example is actually rather dry! (The drier the bubbly, the harder it is to cover up faults.) It is made by Mionetto, a very well known and popular brand nationwide. But it’s their vintage “Millesimato Brut,” a Prosecco of a higher pedigree. The grapes are hand-harvested from the best, (and oldest) hillside geological sites. Only these are permitted to carry the “Superiore” designation. This is just the kind of wine that first made people perk up and fall for Prosecco.

2016* Mionetto Prosecco Superiore,‘Rive di Santo Stefano,’ Millesimato Brut $23-25 srp

Light straw color with green highlights. The bubbles are small and clean with lovely, overt elements of pear, apple, wildflowers, lemon and a touch of almond. Extremely vibrant and persistent, its flavors are creamy, suggesting peaches, yet very refreshing – with a nice dry “cut” of mineral liveliness on the finish. This harmonious wine is 100% Glera grape, and gets friendlier with each sip. Good all alone or with crudités, simple fish or pasta primavera. Drink now-2019.

90/100 points

*The vintage date is tiny and located on the back label.

SHARE
Arturo Ciompi
Trained as a classical clarinetist and conductor, Arturo plied his trade for many years in New York, performing with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York City Opera, the American Symphony and countless chamber music groups. While living in Durham, Arturo became the wine manager at two iconic gourmet stores: Fowler’s in Durham and Southern Season in Chapel Hill. He had a wine spot on NPR in the ’90s and has been a continuously published wine journalist since 1997. He has won national awards for his work and is currently writing for Durham Magazine and its weekly blog, “Wine Wednesdays”. In addition, he loves teaching the clarinet. Read more on his website.