A Wine Worthy of a Special Search

A Wine Worthy of a Special Search

An Italian white with Burgundian complexity

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Most people don’t think much about aging white wines. Of course there are wonderful exceptions; predominantly white Burgundies, Alsace whites and the great Mosel and Rhine Rieslings of Germany. But there are other regions also out to prove they can make wines that not only age, but actually improve with requisite time in the bottle. Today’s example, from Casal Thaulero, in Abbruzi, Italy, is called “Thalè” and is made from the Trebbiano grape. At 10 years of age, it is showing complexities and flavors that can only be described as thrilling. Not an easy wine to find, it is truly worthy of a special search.

2007 Thalè Trebbiano d’Abruzzo, Casal Thaulero $40 srp*

Burnished, golden yellow color – by sight it could be a Sauternes! A creamy, lemon cake nose, joined by lilting elements of caramel, butterscotch and toffee make this white Burgundy-like in its depth.  Flavors are silky smooth and refined, a texture that lingers long on the palate, with apple, pear and citrus overtones. Elegantly dry, poised and balanced, its a succulent wine and a fascinating experience. Try with chicken in a velouté sauce or fresh tuna steaks.

93/100 points

* Although I tasted the 2007, the 2009 and 2010 seem to be the most available vintages.
  The care this wine receives, plus the warm climate of Abruzzi, promises similar results.

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Arturo Ciompi
Trained as a classical clarinetist and conductor, Arturo plied his trade for many years in New York, performing with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York City Opera, the American Symphony and countless chamber music groups. While living in Durham, Arturo became the wine manager at two iconic gourmet stores: Fowler’s in Durham and Southern Season in Chapel Hill. He had a wine spot on NPR in the ’90s and has been a continuously published wine journalist since 1997. He has won national awards for his work and is currently writing for Durham Magazine and its weekly blog, “Wine Wednesdays”. In addition, he loves teaching the clarinet. Read more on his website.