An Italian Rendition of the Champagne Art

An Italian Rendition of the Champagne Art

For meats and cheeses, or on its own, this Ferrari Perlé Brut is delightful

SHARE

8_ferrari-perle-vintage-trentodocLooking for a high-quality alternative to French Champagne? Many other estates within France itself, not to mention Spain, Germany, United States and even England are making just that! Ferrari, located in Trento, Italy, has been making “Metodo Classico,” (Italian for “Methode Champenoise” whereby the second fermentation to produce the bubbles is achieved within the bottle) since 1902.

Ferrari (long owned by the Lunelli family), makes today’s wine, the 2009 Perlé Brut. This is a 100% Chardonnay, which sits on its yeasty sediment (or “lees”) for five years before being disgorged (to remove that sediment) and then released to the market. This is a delightful wine for drinking with or without food, and also for discussing what makes this splendid wine similar, yet decidedly different, from its French counterparts.

2009 Ferrari Perlé Brut, Metodo Classico, Trento D.O.C. $38 srp

Yellow to brilliant gold in color. A smorgasbord of pear, apple and citrusy notes, underpinned by a mineral edge and fresh pastry/brioche-like warmth. The flavors are firm yet full-bodied with a creamy lemon custard texture and a long vibrant finish. It’s persistent and lush with suggestions of peach and unsweetened almond paste. Simply delicious by itself or to accompany fatty cheeses or meats. Drink now-2018.

92/100 points

SHARE
Arturo Ciompi
Trained as a classical clarinetist and conductor, Arturo plied his trade for many years in New York, performing with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, New York City Opera, the American Symphony and countless chamber music groups. While living in Durham, Arturo became the wine manager at two iconic gourmet stores: Fowler’s in Durham and Southern Season in Chapel Hill. He had a wine spot on NPR in the ’90s and has been a continuously published wine journalist since 1997. He has won national awards for his work and is currently writing for Durham Magazine and its weekly blog, “Wine Wednesdays”. In addition, he loves teaching the clarinet. Read more on his website.