Think Fritter: A New Way to Eat Your Veggies

Think Fritter: A New Way to Eat Your Veggies

Summer's bounty means juicy tomatoes and zucchini aplenty – celebrate those fresh tastes with this vegan fritters recipe

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FullSizeRenderSummer is here, and that means so many great vegetables are at the farmers’ market; if you have your own garden, you might start to see blooms transitioning into various fruits and vegetables. If you do have your own garden, you’ll soon wonder what to do with all that zucchini – once it starts producing, you could probably pick a zucchini a day. After you’ve had all the grilled, sautéed and roasted zucchini you can stand, check out these vegan fritters. The grated zucchini acts as the moisture for the fritter batter and, as a result, you do not need to add any liquid or eggs. As a matter of fact, you can added grated to zucchini to any baked goods – or even meatballs – to add a healthy moisture.

I like to serve these with a tzatziki sauce, but really, because they are so moist, you don’t need it. And if you still have leftover zucchini, it freezes really well once it is grated! So give it a try … it’s “grate!”

Tomato and Zucchini Fritters (Serves 8)

4 medium tomatoes, finely chopped
1 large zucchini, grated
1 medium onion, minced
1½-2 cups self-rising flour (depending on the juiciness of the tomatoes)
½ bunch parsley, finely chopped
½ bunch mint, finely chopped
salt and pepper
canola oil, for frying

Prepare the batter: Combine all ingredients except flour in a bowl, and then add enough flour to make a thick fritter batter (it may take closer to 2 cups).

Fry: Heat ½ to 1 inch of oil to 350 degrees in a nonstick skillet and drop batter into hot oil by the tablespoonfuls. Fry until brown, turn and cook until browned on the other side. Drain on paper towels and season with salt while hot. Serve with lemon wedges or with tzatziki sauce.

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Katie Coleman
Katie is the chef/owner of Durham Spirits Co. She is a South Carolina native and has spent the last 15 years cooking all over the world, including France, Italy and most recently, Seattle. She also teaches classes at Southern Season.